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手机打鱼2020年06月03日19时32分36秒

时间:2020-06-03 19:32:37 作者:百度图片 浏览量:11387

复制网址打开【AG88.SHOP】下厨房 10LTa5rqText sizeAaA\a&/ldquo;/It’s \unfa【ir t\o say they are jumping 】on t】he ba/n/dw/\agon, 】natur【e documentaries have always \been motivate\d by conse\rvation.” 【Sa【t in his office at University Col】le/ge L/ondon, lec】ture【r in/ sci/ence communication, Dr Jean-Baptiste Gouyon\/ expla】ins to /me \how nature documentaries/ have come \full circle by\ embracing th\【eir roots in envi/ronmentalism.【 In the early days of TV【, he reveals, f\ilms a\bout/ animals\ helped】 to estab【lish th\is brand new medium【 as 【/a source】 of trustworthy informa/tio/n. Docum】enting and catalo【】guing biodiversi】t\y, they told 【timeless stories of 】creatures no\/t s【o dissimilar to u/s.“Befo【\re \Attenborough was Atten/borough, it w/as common to see scientists 【at work,” Gouy/on says, but things began t\o change】/ as the \century wore on. With the i】nc】\reasing doom and gloom of environmen/tal cris/is loo【min【g ov\er the general 【population, film【makers rejec【ted 】stories abou【t wh\at was】 reall】y h\appenin】g to 【th/e pla【net. “\The【re 】was a documented reluctanc【e to eng【age with envi【ronmental is】sues, they d】idn&rsqu\o;/t】 wa\nt to push audiences 】away.”D】avid Attenbo【rough \makes a spee】ch /at /a cerem】on】y f/or \t/he\ naming of the RRS Sir 【D】avid Atte【nboro\ughAsadour Guzelian/ASSO【CIATED 【PRES【\/SAsadour GuzelianDuring the【 1990s, however, things began to change. “A s【hift in the cultural context has happe】ned and t】here is more acceptance \that 【we are in a bad sit\uation.” Having been bombarded with years of ongoing【 catastrophe, pe/o/ple had becom【e too w//】ell informed to keep tolerating a\【 w】a】te\red-down /version of【 the t【ruth. It has beco/me imposs】ible to ignore /he】/ says, “the state of【 the】 \plane/t i【s wh/at /it i【s.&【rdquo;Now 】we&rs】【qu\o】;re hooked. 14.1 million people watched\ the BBC&/rsquo;s【 27 series, Blue Planet II mak\ing it the】 most-watch【ed 】T\V prog】\ramme in Britain that 】year, /a\ccordin\g to the BBC. Natural history】 persona】/\li】ties lik\e David Attenborough have 】bec/ome big 【stars, successfully\ transf】/orming from amateur ecologists to/ folk hero【es for those p】lagued by eco-anxiety. We have beg\un to recognis【\e the p【ower of /t\he e】nvironme/nt/al film and\ its potential make us \think a lot harder a/bout t/ackling proble/ms lik【e plasti】c pollution.Waste from wors】h【i//p: solvin\g Indi\a's unique river pollution p】【roblemWATCH | Shrink【ing pelican b/reeding grounds restored after BP\ 【oil spillSerbia will plant 1 billion tre】e\s\ in【 o【rder to reach net zero t\ar\get by 205【】0The 】power of movi/ng pictu【res“There is no doubt that film as a mediu】m has massive power to elicit/ an emotional rea\ct/ion,】&rdq】uo; says\ Gouyon\, “but there isn’t 】really any】 hard evidence to/ prove this yet.&r】dquo【; More s/o than the\ writt】en w【ord, these documentaries 】seem to pique our interest/ in the\ p/lanet and poten】\ti/ally even d】rive/ 】us to take action. A sur/\vey of U】K superm/arket/ shoppers found th【at 88】 per】ce\//nt o【f people【 who watc】hed Blue Plan】et II\ had \changed their behaviour \as a resul【t.After watching th\e \series\, Da\río Fern&aa\cute;ndez-Bellona, a postdoctoral rese【archer at Univers】ity College 】Cork, noticed th【at th/e programme w】as consistent/ly \tr\ending on twitte/r the evening】 it aire】d. He started to wonder just how much these\ 】docum【entaries are able to affect our behavio\ur. Using 3000\Te】xt sizeAaAa/A s\how【case of t】ho/usands of completel\y sustainable f\abrics is co】ming to London, or】ganiser The Sustainable【 Angle has announced.【The not-for-profit o/r/g/anisation has been a rele】ntl】\ess/ 【s【upporter of innovative/ lower\ carbon solutions to fashio/n&rsquo【;s biggest problems【 since 2010 and hopes that this/ \ev/ent 】will encourag/e ev/en/ more /designe】】rs and creators【 to adopt 】respo/n【sible solutions.】This will \be the ninth e/dit】ion of the Fut】ure Fabrics Expo which is the l\argest sho【wcase of sustainable fabrics of its k】ind. /With each f\abr【ic, informa/tion about where it has com/e from and 】/the/ environm\e/nta【l footpri/nt\ of【 its】 manufacture w\il/l be/【 provided. I【ncreas【ing tr\an/sparency in【 how our clothing i/s made is on】e\ way to he/lp bot【h designers and co【nsumers to 【make responsi\ble choice【s.Materials /o\n show will】 include 】the i/ncreas\i【ngly popular TENCEL Lyoce\ll and Modal as well as【 several fa/brics th】at take an innovative approach to post-cons【】umer recycling. Wi\th fashion waste /firm【ly in】 【the spotl【igh【t this season, there is a real dri【ve from /\consum】ers towa/rd more circular soluti【ons\】.These m\ode【rn approa\】ches will be e/xhibited alongside co/mpanies that ch】ampion t/rad\it\ional sustainable ma】te/rials/ like line/n and bast. Although less common i/n modern designs, these ancient f【】ab/rics are biodeg】radable and water-efficient. 【The plant fi【b【res fr】om 【】【whi】ch\ they are grown can ev\/en sequester C【O/ from the atmosphere.Founders of the expo, 】The【 Su】stainable Angle, hope t】o change the fash/ion i】ndustry \for the bet/ter s【o that, instea/d of stri】ppin/g resources an/】d p/oll\uting environments, \it can【 have a 】po/sit/i/ve impa【ct on n\ature an\/d the communities that 】\make o】ur cloth/es.Read/ More | W\【hat is Tencel? \T//h【e s\ustainable fabric e/v【eryone is 】talking /aboutClaire\ Bergk/am\p, Global Director of S【us【ta】inability and Innovation, Stella McCartney (left) in/ 【convers\ation/ with Orsol/a de Castro, Co-foun】der of Fashion Revolution】 (right)【\.Suzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustaina】\ble AngleAs well as showing off materials th\at designers can u】se t】o /decrease the e】nviro】nmental impact of t\heir own 【de】signs, the F/uture】 F【abrics\ Expo will also h【o\st panels to h\elp】/ ed/ucate atte\n】de/es and fac\ilitate discussion between industry exp【e【rts. Panels for\ the ninth Future F【abrics Expo will b/e】 focus\ed around r【egenera】t\i】ve, circul/ar ap】proaches to sust\ainable des【ign and how fashion can be a “powerful force /for positive change”.Future\【/ Fashion ExpoS\uzanne Plunkett /The 【Sustainable AngleAt 】a /p】an/el at last 【year’s event, Claire Bergkamp, Glob/al Director of Susta】】】inability and \Innovatio】n at Stella\ McCart/ney emphasised t\he value【 of eve\nts like t\his i】n helping to eradicate unsustainable mat】er\ial\s from t【he【 fashion in【du\/stry; “We have to \repl/ace them with i/nnova】t\ive, sustainable alternatives. The o/】ther half of inno】vati】on in the【】 future of fabrics has to be about rethinkin】g t【he syst】em【s 【tha】t we /have now…/【How can we find lower-im【pact ways o\f【】 】creating things?”.Part of the /Expo last year al】】so in【cluded two curated areas dedic\ated to fashion bra\nds fully embraci\ng responsib/le s】our\cing and circularity in thei【/r 【collections. New collaborati/on/s【 between leading designers and companies c/reating inno】vative new material\ technologies are the ideal outcome from this event.Suzanne Plunkett /The 】Sustainable A】ngle【The \【event will take place from the 29th-3】0th Januar/y 2020 at\ Victoria House, Bloomsbur\y Square, 】L】ondon. Tick/et registratio/n f/or de【【signers/ and brands /can be/ found h\er【e.Share this article \ 】More /from l\ife twee\ts and figu】res for v//isit/s to the Wiki/pedia 】pages 】of the animals f/eatured in【 the series, he a/nalysed this data to see what, i/f any\, /patter\ns of behav】iour were influenced by watching the show.His rese\】arc【h fo\und /that 【just 6 percent 【of th\e actual programme 【wa【s about envir【onmental issues a】nd/ a m/【er\e 1 【percent of tweets me/ntioned these t\o】pics.【 T\hese figur【e/s/ didn&rs/quo;t/ look promisi\n】g. Docu】mentar】i】es clearly a\ren/&rs】quo】;t/ usel/ess for conservation, howe/ver, as they \al\ter ou【r perception of wi\ldl【if】e in other 【ways. The Wikipedia pages for each of the【\ animals that appe\ared 】\in episodes of Blue Plane/t【 2 had an annual spike】 【/in visits imm【ediat【ely f】】ollowing the【 broadcast of/ the s【how. Ev\e/n this s/mall connection with nature could be enough to create 【an awa/ren/ess crucial to avoiding /【an exti/nction.One of the mos\t successful elem\en/ts of the moder\n nature】 docume/ntary is t\he &ld//quo;ma【king-of&r【dquo; segment. Usually a short section】】 s【eparate【 from the main show t】h\at reveals how/【 s【ome】 of the scenes we】】re shot, the “making-】of&】rdq【uo;\ le【ts us s【ee behind】 the \scenes【.【】 It a\lso helps to break dow/n the】【 i\nvisib【le wall bet/ween the viewer and t】h/e animal】s. “Films show /nat\ure with】out \humans,/ not \as somethi】ng t/o en】gag】e with,【&】rdquo; explains Dr Gouy】on, “【the cameraman can be a role model for ordinary people \and express more emot【ional responses.” It h/elps the audien/ce】, /usu】ally tuc】/ked a/way in their living room in increasing\ly u\rban\ised societies, to engage w\ith a world they hav/e bec】ome】 distant from.D/ocumenting the fut】u/】reEngagem【ent is un【do\u【\btedly the best /way to get us to\ care\ more ab/out the state of the planet. I【f we】/ want】 t\o mak【e film\s mor\e effective in the future, Gouyo】n 【【【s【ugges】ts, we nee/【d to encourage that en\gagement by giving the came【ras to local populations to document their own experience/s. &ld/q】uo;We can’t go by the impe】rialist model of Brito/n’s going\ and watching 】wil\dlife.”Portrayals of enviro】nmental i【ssu【/es can have【 different\ effect\s in diff\erent countr【ies.\UnsplashWe /respond 】far b/etter, \it seems, to films about environm【【ental issues that resonate /with our own \life \experie\n】ce\. \A good exa】/mple of this/ is】 the international re/sponse to the d【ocumentary T/he Co\ve.】 The 2009 Oscar Award/-win/ning piece about do\lphin hunting/ 】in Taiji, Japan cause【d indign/【ant outrag\e amon】g west】ern audien】ces. Its thriller-style tr/e【atment of ‘uncove/ring&【rsquo; the practice using spy-cams didn&/rsquo;t/, however, go down we】ll \with/ audiences in t/he \co/\untr【y【 wh】ere\ it was shot an【d many show【ings/ were met with protests.This k【ind of document/ary c/l/early raises a】wareness but\, with\i\n the communities a】ble to acti\vel/y change pr【actices har\mful to the en/vir\onment it rarely has the same impa】ct. Despite /already 】】having risen to astronomical levels o\f popularit】y, there【 is still a lot of scope for t】h\ese programm】es to do more 【fo/】r conservation. Choos【ing to cha】mpion l\oca/l voices co/uld spell the end for popular ec【o-h/eroes like David Attenborough, but it m【ight【 just 【be the kind of convincing many peop\l/e n【eed to take action on cl/i【ma【te change.Share th/\is article M\ore /from l】ifeIHUQ

X0BU【/Spar】kle look\s to a gre///ener futu\r\e with the op\ening of its fourth data centre in GreeceivtU

LlC1Text 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from placesAMeQTeBu

5wn5In Pic】tu【res:】 Deforestation in Brazil's rainforest\【 】【is close to five time/s the size of Lon\don\R5LA

nG0kMEPs ba/ck initiati\ve to reduce p/lastic waste a\n\d improve water qualitygcfp

xzjjText sizeA/a】AaIt tur【n\s out, the Duke of S【us\sex/ is/ an amazin\g phot\ogr】ap\her. And he ch\ose Eart/h D/ay to】 give a proof of that, as【 h【e posted 8 of his s/tunning 【images about natu/re on Inst【agram, in ord【/er to sh【are his environm/ental 【point of view. "Today is #earthday - 【an】 opportun】ity to learn ab/out, celebrate】 【and continue】 to safegua\rd our planet/, our 】home【," the caption reads. Fro】m critically【\ 【en\dang】e/red /species to【】 \plas/tic】 pollution,\ /the selection provide【s\ an ove【rview of today's most pressing en】v/ironme【ntal issu【es./Prince】 Harry's comm\itmen/t to protecting/ \the env\ironment is alrea】dy widely known. The Duke and Duchess of Sus/s\ex even used their own wedding day as an action ag\ai\n/st ocean pollution by as】king wel\l-wis【hers to support cer\t/ain\ cha【rities instead of offering gifts. In the me【antime, Meghan, Duchess of S【ussex ha/s already【\ /been recogniz【ed f/or her 【ethical fashion choices. The /ro】yal household is also com/mitte【d t【o reducing its en\vironmental impact\, amon\g othe\r measures, the Buckingham Palace has anno】unced 】some change/s last\ year】, such as cu\tti】ng back on【 the use of plast\ics, in ord\er】 to figh】t agai/【nst 】plasti】c pollution.Click on the【 video above to/ see the /ph【oto\s ta/ken by Prin】ce Harry.S\hare this article \ More from【 lifeAMBl

A/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tags

9Fb2Text sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesKDNp

abKSText si】zeA】【aAaCan a univ\ersity&r【squo;s campus building promote【】\ sustainabi】lity and care \for the environment while also bei【n】g an architect\ur】al】】 marvel? /Budapest/’s Central Eur】opean U\ni\versity (\】C\E【U)【 proves that the l/ec/ture hall\s in which we /study ref】lect ou/r【 acknowledgement of the【 seriousness of climate change, p【/ut \us on a path towards alle\viating carb/on emissions and wast【e, and enrich 】our concept of aesthetic bea【\u】ty.I【/n July, 2015 CEU【 became【 the second highe【r educatio\n insti【tution in contin【enta/l Eur【ope, and the first \in Central and Easter】n Europe, to receive the BRE【EAM 【(Bu【ilding 】Research Establ【ish】ment Environmental As【sessme\nt Method) certificatio【n, th/e world's le】ading design a/nd /a】ssessment method for sustainable buil\di\ng】s.Two 】of【 \the【 campus&//rsquo; buildings – the Nador 15 a】n】d\ the Nador 13 &n\dash; have been BREEA/M certified. 】In\ 20//1【7, th】ese bui/ldings won the CEU \/the Env】ironmental S【ocial an\d Sust\ainability 【A\ward, part of the CIJ Awar/ds Hun【gary competition spons】ored 【by CIJ, Europe’s 】l\//ea【ding【 Real Estate digital and pri/nt news provi【d】er.The n【】ew and 】imp】roved/ bu【il\dings boast features s】/uch as micro-shading, high f/requency lighti】\ng a//nd n/atural li\ght, cover】ed /courty/ards, preserved b\rick work /a/s cons\truction mater\ial, bio\diversity an/d open\ air spaces on camp】us and motion, air quality and temperatu\re data collection with build\ing management software, among o【the/rs.Insi\de the N15 buildi\ngCEU/Daniel VegelCEU's ro\oftop gardenC/EU/Da】niel VegelWe】 too【k a tour】 o/f t】he stunning N13 and 【N15 bu\ildings with Tamara Steger (Associ】ate Pr】ofessor in CEU’s】 Environmental Sciences】】 Department\【 and the Chair of 】the /Su【sta】inability Committee a】t \the time)\ and Loga【n Strencho】】ck (CEU’s/ MSc En】viron\mental Scie【nces【, /Poli【cy and Management a/】lumnus 【and cu【rrent Enviro】nmental and Su//stainability Officer), both of whom were inv【olved in t\he project from \day one.Why B\REEAM?/Logan: “We could have【【 chosen from a few 】different susta/inabilit】】y【 stan】d】a【rds such as LEE\D, the/ Danish b】uildi】ng codes or t【he /German Energ\y Conservation Regulation】s but we】/ dec/i】d】【ed to 】pur【\sue BREEA【M b/ecause we】 a/re in a】n u】rban campus 【[CEU’s campus is【 in the heart 】of historic Pest】] and we have a mix of old\ and new buildings, so 【that was the mos【t suitable for us.&rdq】uo; View this\ po/st on Instagram/Dear n\ew CEU /Class, welcome to 【#【Budapest! Thi/s what th】e #walktoschool will lo\ok like f/or many of you. Hope you'll enjoy your time with us! #WelcometoCEUA p】ost \shar/ed b/y Cent【ra/l European Univer【si/ty 】(@ceuhungary) on Se】p 3, 2018 at 4:21am PDTCEU in\ historic PestTamara: &l\dquo;While there was in】terest in support【ing green building fea\tu】res\, BR【EEAM certi【fication\ 】was/ not a given at first. C/EU considered th\e eviden【ce and 【was convinced of the i】mportance 【and value of h/aving ce\rtific】ation/\ 】to reflect t】he rigor【\ i//n its commitment to sustainability /a】nd its prom\inent 】r】ole\/】 in academic excel】/【lence as well./ T\he\ certif/ication was also an importa】n\t ga】uge that co】uld assure the edu/cational, environmental and econ\】omi/\c benefi\ts based/ on specif/ic and reputable\ standar\ds 【and criteria. By \pursuing BREEAM, the\ administration】 saw the opp\ortunities to 【【save money, demons/【trate furthe】r /their/ commitment to sustainabilit】y, and eve】ntually take advantage of the important learn/ing opportunities manifested in\ th/】e building\s' des【ign a/nd operations】.&rdquo\;Th/e path to /BRE】EAMLogan: &ldquo/;In\ 2009, the university signed a 【susta/inable development p\olicy bu【t without the tools to do anything, i【t was mostl/y a nicely worded do\cum】ent. So when in 2012-2013, the univ/ersity decided to kick off a redevelopment project it was decided t【hat i】t wa【s in everyone&r\squ【】【o;s inte】rest to d\esi\gn an effic/ie/n】t building. In order 【/to achi/eve th\is, the university nee\ded a team /to work on th/i/s full/ time and so 【the S\ustainab】ility Officer position /was /created. The firs【【t item on 】my a【genda w/as to 【persuade the administra【tion t\o pursue/ BR【EEAM because i【t \【would show that】 we/’re t/aking step\s outside of ‘business as\ usu】al&r【squo; /and taking sus\tainability seriously】. We\ knew it would c【ome with a lot 【of extra costs and effort b【ut we】 w/a】n【ted to do it right.&\rdquo;Tama\ra:/ “In term/s of【 the environmental i【mpacts, the campus 【before was not【 as 】energy an【d water efficient; acc\ess to r//ecyc\ling b】ins 【and fil】tered water was limited; and the Ja【panese Garden was /not as ecologically friendly a】s the N15 rooftop. 】The redeve【l】o【/p【ment effort n】ot only drew on【 general e/nvironmental and economic con】cerns, b/ut d【emonstrated CEU's commitme】nt to sustain\abili\ty education/ as sig】nato\】ry to the Copernicus Charter and its Sustaina/ble Dev\elopment】 Po\licy.&\rdq\uo;CEU's rooftop \garde】nCE】\U/【Danie【l VegelLogan: “At t\h【e time, there were a few contrac/tors here in Budapest who were famil/iar with BRE and LEED because a few b【anks and private c\ompanies had \already b\een certif】ied in Hung】ary. But our pr】】o\ject was especiall【y【 complex b【【ecau\se we are in the heart o】f th【e 5th distr【ict【, in a historically significant build\ing and we ha//d to take/ d/own one /building entirely on【 a 【very small const】/r【uction foo】t\prin】t, all while keeping 【the university r【u】nning full 【time. \Ge】t\ting the BREEA\【M certification \takes a\ long time and requires a lot【 of \documenta】t】ion, which can get quite complicated be/cause the】 inspectio】n is \very【 rigorous a【】nd thorough &/n/dash; as】 it\ s【hould be, of c【】ourse. But/ we\ knew this whe【n we d【eci【ded to embark on th\is redev【elo【pment proj/ect.&r】dquo;The new, im\proved and BREEAM】/-certifi/ed CEU campusTamara: &】ldquo;The new\ BREEAM certified buildings reflec】t CEU's o】wn charac/ter as an i【nnovative, visi】onar/y place of learn【/ing and research wi】th concrete (l【ite【\rally and f/iguratively!) im\pact【. In addit/ion to th】e】 direct green benefits, the new campus buildi】ngs /also nurt【\ured the CEU community in 】a different way /in terms of learning and learning experiences, c【\ommunity inter】actions and teaching. The CEU community is incr】easingly aw【are/ of recycl】ing d\ue to th/e p/resence o\f recycling bins.Recognition and awards for the N13 【and N15 buildi\ngs, including/ thei【r environ/mental features, ha\ve been well publicize\d 】drawing attention to the beauty and /impor\tance of environmental 】sustainabilit】y. The bu/i【ldings reflect ou/】r acknowledgement of the seriousness o】f climate chan/g【e\ and pra【ct【i/cal steps in \the【 【/direction\ 【of alleviating c】arbon emi【ssion【s and waste.【”I\nside the N15 buildingCEU///Zolt/a\n Tub】aLogan: “W【as it \all w【orth it? 】Yes! BREEAM guided the b】uilding design and【\ the c】onstruction m\an\agement process to be comprehensive with concern for long-term functio【nality, sustainability a\nd the environm】ent.&rd\quo;Ta】mara: &l\d【quo;One/ of the \features of t【he new buildings/ that 【I really like ar【e 【the old b\ricks that were reuse\d from the previous buildi【ng. The library a\nd classro】om\s have facilitated new possibilit/ies for st/【udying/, learn【\in【g, networking and】 teaching\ such as priva】te meetin\g rooms 【in /the】 library and s】\mart b】\oard【s/ in the c【las\sr【ooms. /Since being loca/ted in N13, I run i【nto colleagues from different\ depart\ments much 【more fr/equen【tly a【nd enjoy the opportunities to catch up \on news, resea\rch oppo\rtunitie】s, et】c.【”CEU's re-used brickwor\kCEU/Zoltan Tuba】Logan:】 “\What is【 truly uni】que ab/out】 the new ca】mpus is the roof garden. I【 haven’t se【en an【y /othe\r central】ly【 【【locat/ed u\niversity building with s\uch 【a space. The way /that th\e N13 】buil\d\ing wa】s la】rg\ely preserved but reinvented/ is also an ac\/hie/vem】ent in and of itself. We\ re\used a lo\t of bri】ck-work【 from the buil\ding th/at was /t/aken down 】as opposed to 】【using fresh con/structi】on material, which 【】/has a significant en】vironment\al impact reductio【n. Arch【itecture-wise】, I find the lib/ra】ry 【【to be a real/ly n【ice space not /only for r\ead\ing【 and studying, but\ also 【f/o【r 【rela/xing \thanks t\o \the lay out and the nat\ural ligh【t that \manages to penetr\ate 【and t【he stunning city views you get from some of the li/【brary’s /windows.Wha】t I hope the redev\elopmen\/t project and th\e BREE/A】M cer【tification reall【y ac】hiev【e is teaching /】\people how to r\eally have an impact wit】h\ their research. You’re not done once the bu/ilding】 is/ built. We have an/ environme】ntal sciences department here at CEU which activ】el\y engages with environment【al so【cial\ mov\ements in Bud/ape【st, Hungary&\rsq/uo;s r】egions and the Centr/al Euro/pea\n region as a wh【ole【. I hope】 this new buil【dings further motivates th\e/ p\rofess//ors and\】 th】e\ student com\muni】ty t】o have【 a \real/ impac/t with 】their resear/ch.&r【dquo; View t【his post on InstagramSpri\/ng 】is here! Check o/ut \the Li\br】ary’s view/ onto /one of CE】U’s newly】-planted vertical gardens! It&rs/quo;s #takeoverTuesday with the #【C\EULi\/b\rary】.【 #sp/ottedatCEU #v\erticalgardening #springA pos/t shared by Central Eu】ropean Uni\versity (@ceuhun】gary) on Mar 21/, 2017 a\t 2:26a\m P/D【TCEU【\ Libr/aryAlthou【【gh at pre【\sent there is st【il【l some uncertainty 【r\eg/ar\ding CEU’s s【/tatus in Hungary due to long-running political\ tensions, \the university ret【ain\】s accreditation as a Hu】【ngarian university and will seek to c/ontinue teaching \and research activi\ty in Budapest as long as】 poss【i\ble.Share this article More/ from life762K

mTVtThe big, bea/【utiful Baltic Sea 【/hides /a dirty secret in its 377,00】0km of water.A\ 【number of agricultural/ spills has turned t】he Baltic【 into one of /t/he most /pol】lu\ted】 seas in】 the wor】ld, due to excess nitrogen \and phos\phorus lacing it】s wat【ers.This process of eutrophication ha\s【 led to \the de\pl/etion \/of oxyg】en and /an【 overg\】rowt【h of algae in the body o【f wa】ter, 【but not 【al\l h】ope/ is 【】lo】st.\Eutrophication ex/p】lai【nedAn unlik】ely assist/an】tMussel farms lik\e【 Kieler Meeresfarm【 in the Germ【an port city of Kie】l are ho/p】ing 【to ma【ke a dif】f【eren】ce in th/e 【Baltic'】s/ increasin\g【ly di【fficult fight\ against algae.Hundreds o【f tho】usands of th\ese mighty mol/lus\cs wo/rk to filter the water eve/ry day by\ eating their way through microsc】opic a\lg】ae.Kieler Meeresfarm 】is just one f】arm taking pa\rt in Balt/ic Blue Growth, an experimental【 Europe/an pro】ject coordinated based in\ Sweden's Ostergötland region.Th【e】 p/roj【ect is worth 4.6 million Euros, with/ 3.6 million 】Euros coming from regional aid under the EU Coh/esion Policy. 18【 partners in six B【altic co【untrie】s are taking p/art.All six participating farms/ are locate】d in importa【nt】 strategic locations across th\/e Baltic region/.The farms are all in close co】n\t【act with \each】 other, sharing techn/iques and /ideas despite having diffe/rent\ experiences.Kieler】 Me】eresfarm f】ounder Tim Sr【a\ufenberge/r \says '】'I'm having【 here diffe【rent【 conditions th【\an in Sweden. So w/ha【t 】works for me doesn't really wo】rk in】 Swed\en and/ vi/ce versa b\ut we 【can talk\ to each other and have that \shari【ng of i/deas.''T【he wate】\r quality and transparency is mea】sured twice a year and researc\h】ers sa】y that the results ar【e conclusive.1212121212121212More than/】 just mu【ssels\NGO Coas\【tal Union Germany, EUCC, is 】als】o helping to raise soci】al awa/ren/ess on imp/ro\ving water qual】ity.EUCC has cre【at【e】d a number of databases and learning tools for intern【a】tional networ】ks, providing\ relevant i】】nform【/at【ion, wo】rkshops /and 】conferenc\es about/ the im/porta/nce /of usin】g】 musse/【ls to impro】v/e wa】te/r qualit/【y i/n \the Baltic Sea.Looking to the futureThe project's ultima】te aim is \to bring r【eal change to the【 Baltic Sea region.This i】\s 【expected to be done in revolutionis/ing\ the us】e o/f /musse/】l meal for ani【mal feed. The【 project is expe【】cted to also at\tract int/erest from broader \markets,/ at/tracting /entrepreneur/s /and in\vestment in mussel m\eal as a viable alternative to curre【nt\ animal feed.Watch s】ome of【 ou【r social media coverageShare this】 ar】t【icleC\opy/】paste the ar\//ticle video em【be\】d link below:Cop】y【\ShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSharese\ndMoreHideShareSendSh】areShareShareS【end/ShareShareYo】u mi/ght also like/ / \ / 【 Devise【 P【roject: Ireland puts the spotli\ght on digital/ SMEs / \ / 【 More aboutContamination of waterEn【vironmental 】protecti】/\onF/aun】a and F【loraGermany Browse today'\;s tagsVb9t

0I3bThe l【ingering death of the Dead Sea5emf

Kn84Text sizeAaAaLondon-based desi【gn fi\rm Pries】tmanGoode has launc】hed a s\ustainably/ made in-flight meal tray meant for pass\engers, a】】s pa【r/t【 o】f its ‘Get Onboard: Reduce. Reuse. Rethink&rs\quo/; proj【ect. The eco-friendly proof is in the puddin】g - as】 the【 final prototype is\ 】edible too.The new mea】l tray is made fr】om completely fo/od-safe, bio【degradeable constituen\ts. The tray itsel\f is】 made from coffee grounds and e】v】erythi】ng,\ down to the salad box l】id, is made from alternative materials】 like banana leaf and algae. The desig【n //studio had various \aims wh\en/ c】】reating】】 the concept, /inclu\ding /a reduction of single-】u/se pla\stics 【ge/nerated from a normal on【-board【 /【meal service, which the\y have managed to ac【hieve.【Other impressive\ fe\a\ture【s include an edi】ble desse】rt lid made from wafer, a reus】able s【pork made/ from coconu】\t wood, c\apsules used for sauces 】or milk/ ma/de from\ soluble seaweed and a【 h【ot mai\n \/me/al li//d made fr【】o【m \bamboo.Edib\le airline meal trayPriestmanGoode\“While there is currently no pe【【rfect solution\, \this】 \des【ign proposa】l aims to encourage su\pp】/l/iers and ai\rlines to rethin/k the m\eal servi【ce in a more eco-friendly manner, 】particu/l】arly ahead of legislation t/o ban single-use plastic,】 which in】/ som\e/ 】count\【\ries is pr】o【po/sed for as early as /2021,” say】s Jo Rowan, Associate/ //Strategy Director at Pri【estmanGood】e,/ in a press \rel】ease.Th【e design team has also inven【te/d 【a new travel【\ water bottle,/ feat【ured bel/o】w, made\ /from compostable bio-plastic and cor】k. I\t/ is desi【gned /to be used ove【r a short/-term period such as /a\ holiday and\ refilled regularly. While on-board, a water co】oler \cart would ideally be availab\le o/n the a】ircraft/, allowing /passeng】ers to refill dur【ing/ the flight to【 mini【mise buying plastic bottl/es. View thi\s post on Instagram】How can we reduce plastic bot/tl/e waste w/he/n we t】/\ravel? In our exhibition 'Get Onboard: Re/duce. Reuse. Reth】ink' @designmuseum now open, we pr【opose a w/ater b】ottle】 made from】 】biodegradable and commercial\ly c/ompostable \bioplastic and cork. \The b【ot】\tle is designed for repe\ate/d, \but shor\】【t term u\s【e, like the le/ng/th of your/ holiday, and is\ desi\g】ned \to address the im】pulse\ buy at ai/rports and statio【ns . Did you know that if passengers @heathrow_air/por\t depart/ures loung【es r【efilled from water fountains rather\ than bought plasti/】c bottles, the airport would be a【ble/】 to r】educe it【s plas/tic bott\【le /c】onsumption b/y /35/ million a year. Fa\ct vi//a \@refillhq ./ . . . . #pri\e【stmangoode #getonboard \#su\stainabl】e/design #sustai】nable #sustainability #sustainable\t】/ravel\ #zerowast/e #ecomater\ials #et/hical #cmf #ma\terials #biodegradab\le #compost/【able #\ldf19 #travelne\ws【 #avi】ati/on #in\du/strialdesig/n #pro【ductdesign\ #innovation #【de/【sign #desig】nnew【s #\desig【nthinking #design【studio \#l/o】ndonde】/sign #ecodesign #de】signinspiration #d/esignlife #tr\ansport #biodesign #tran/sportdesign . @design @dezeen @wallpa【perm】ag @designboom @designmilk @l_d_f_offic\ial @thedesi\gnair【 @design_b】urger @designers_need @pr/o\】deez @】lemanoosh_official @id_curate\d /@thepoint【sguy @the】pointsguyuk @design\bunker \@yankodesign @letsdes\【igndai】ly【 @_desig】n【_inspirationA post /share【d by PriestmanGoode (@priestmangood\e) on Se\p 12, 2019 at 11:31p/m PDTGet Onboar\d: Reduce\.Reus】e.Rethink at London's D\】esign MuseumPr/iestm\anGoode】】 s【pecialises【 in 【ind【ustrial d\esi【gn for 【the transp\ort and aviation sectors, with a particular focus on environment\a】l inno/vation【/. Its newes/t exhibitio【n at the Desig\n Museum in London explores \the iss/】ue of【 \waste in travel and \looks 】at how de】velop\ments in eco \mat\e/ri\als can \make the industry more sustainable【./ Materials inclu【de Econyl, a\ regenerated nyl\on yarn made from salvage【d fishi/ng nets, seaweed ya\【rn and 】so\me\ you 【may not have he】ard of like pineapple wood and【 Tasma】n recycle/d glass.【\According to st】a【tisti\cs】 】on their web/site, an esti\mated 5.7 milli【\on \to】nnes of cabin waste is gen】erated \on/ pass【enger fli\ghts every year, from 】sing/le】-use 【plast【ic in am\enities kit】s, to mea】l trays and earphone/s. The exhibition showcases how suppl\iers/, green in】itiatives and attempted cha【nges 【i\n custo\mer beh【avio【ur /can transform o/u】r experience across all transport modes. View this po/st on Instagra【mIf y/o【u're i【n London, 【make \/sure to visit our ex/hibition 'Get Onboar】d: Reduce. Reuse.【 Reth【ink' n\ow showing @desig\nmuseum 【. T【he ex【hibition addresses t】he issu】e of 】waste in travel, and 【explores how design thinking \【and material in【novation can】 help /us\ rethink the produc/ts 【and\ services tha【t /make up our journeys . ./ . . . #priestmangoode #getonboar/d #sustai】nabledesig\n #su】/stainable #s/ustainabil\ity 【#su\stainabletravel #zerowaste #ecomateria【ls【 #ethic/al #cmf #materials #biodegrada\ble #com【postable #ld【f19 #t【/ravelnews 【#aviation #industrialdesign #【productd/esign #innovati\on #design #designnew】s #designthin【k/in【g #d/esignst【udio #/londondesign #ecodesign #design】inspiration #designlife #tra】nsport #biodesign #transportdesign . \@d/ezeen @wallpaperma【】g @designboom @telegra】phtr【\av】el【 @sundaytimest】rave】l @tabilabo @n//atgeotraveluk @lonelyplanetmag @condenast/traveller @travelandleisure\ @timeoutl/】ond\on】】 @londonist_co\】m @wiredA post\ shared by PriestmanGoode (@\priestman/】goode【) on Sep 29\, 2019 at 9:0】9am PDTJo\ Ro】wan /concludes/, P/riestmanGoode want to &ldq】uo;raise awaren】ess of /how much was【te is c/reated when we tr/avel, and expl】ore al】ternat】ives that/ addres\】s t/he supply of】 products a】nd 】services/, but【 also what e/ach in】dividual can do to lead us to a m\ore sustainable travel industry.” 【 Get O/【n/board: Reduce.Reu\se.Rethink】 is on at 】\the\ Design Mu\seum in /London 】from 12th Se】】ptember】 2019/ \until【 9th February 2020.\Sha【re this ar/ticl】e 【 】】 Mor【e 】from】 【lifeRvJR

x4JVText si】zeAaAaThere’s no \doubt about it: /art, in its many forms, is so \much mor/e than a \kind /of s】elf-【express】ion. It 】can often be【 a force for good and much-ne/eded \chan【ge. From photography t】o lively discussion and jaw-dropping footage,/ t\hese are【 the exhibitions and documentar/ies on 【climate change around the \world/ to have on your r\a/d【ar f【or May】 2019.A】r\t + Climate/ = Change FestivalWhere】: Various, Melbourne, Australia\When: Until 19 May 2019This exciting initi\ative is a month-long festi】val 】l/ooking at the way】s 】in w】hich a】rt can make\ a diffe/rence in the】 discussion around sustainabi/li】ty and climate change. This i】s/ a s【eries of curated \exhibitions, artist t【alks and lectures w【ith some o【f【 the most p\romi】nent environment and climate ch】a\nge 】scientists, psycho\lo\gists and res【earchers】 /t\hat aims to open \】【up di/s\cussi】on】 on the wa】ys in\ whi\ch art ca】n work a/【\s an a】cti】vism【 to\o【l. This will be running in Victoria,\ Australia, but /man】y of the talks will be\ filmed, mea【ning you don’t】 have to be in the country to get involve/d wi/th this excit/ing moveme\nt.More infoClimate Change: The\ F\/acts with David AttenboroughNet】work: BBC iPla【yerWhen: Ava【ila\ble /from Ap】【ril 2019If you’ve yet to w/atch \t\his grou】ndbr【eaking BB【C /docu\ment【ar】y, now&rsquo\;s the ti\me. Presented b】y\ t】he world&rsq\uo;s】 most/】【 】resp】ected wi\ldlife doc】ume\ntary m【aker, Dav】id Attenborough cuts through the fake news】 and confu/si】ng statist\ics\ to/ bring 【us the tru】th about what is \act\ually happening to】 \our environment/\. In th】is 】hour-long progr\/amme, issues s】uch as/ sp/ecies extinction【s, deforestation and extreme wea\ther a【re all tackled. Though it i【s som【ewh\at 】harrowing - and worryin】g - to w/atch, there is an /o/verall message of h/op】e:】 that we ha【ve the pow\er/ \to t【urn the tid\【e o/【f 】cli】mate chan/ge /once】 an【d for all.More infoAltered OceanWhere【: The Royal Phot/ographic【 Society, Bristol, U】KWhen: U/ntil\ 23 】June 2019According to statist【ic【s, approxim\ately 8 million\/】 pieces of 【plastic find 【】their way into \the ocean every day. Da/vi/d Attenboroug/h brought th/e i\ssue of p\lasti【c pollu\tion to the forefront b】ack in 2017 with h/is BBC documen】t\ary, Blue】 Plane【t II 【and it has now become one the major climate change /discussi】ons】 between cou\ntries and local communiti/es. 【I/】】n 【this 【pho【to series, Mandy Barke【r has doc【】】ume】nted\ her findings as】 a ph【otog】rapher travelling the world. Comb】ined wit【h resea【【r\ch n【o/tes, /sk/etchbooks and scient/ific s\amples, it combines both art andscience to p【resent a we\l/l-rou【nded exhibition that forces th\e viewer 】to confront t【he realities our oceans are fa\c\i/ng.More infoHuman/ Natu/re】W【here: Muse【um of World Cultu】re, Gothenburg, SwedenWhen: Until M\ay 2020Bringing toge\/ther 【a collection /o/f】 poignan】t photographs】, w/orks o【f 【art an】d other a】\rchived materials, the Museum of Worl/d Cul【ture has curated an exhib【\iti【on that explores the way h/uman lives ar【e di/\rectly affecting th】e planet. Looking \at/ everything from the【 things we \choose to repair and care fo\r versus those we sim/pl\/y consume, as well as sci\entific results in/ envi】ronme\ntal p【sy】chology, it&rsq】uo;s a /fascinat\ing s\tu【dy of th】e relationship between people and the \planet we call ho/me. T【hough it doe【s feed t【h\e visitor some uncomfortable truths,【 the overall m【/essage is one of //hope】, she\dding light on m/a【ny of the positive initiati/\ves tackling to redu/ce o\u\r impact and offering p/racti/cal tips that c【a【n be taken away and in\corpora【ted into 【daily life.Mor】e i【nfoCarmig【nac P\hoto】j//ou】rna】lism Award: Arctic/: New FrontierWh】ere: Sa/atch/i Gal】lery, Lond【on, UKWhen: Until 6 】M\a【y 2019Photographers Yuri Kozyrev an/d Kadir van Lohuize】n have won the S\aatchi 】Ga【ll/e\ry&rs】quo;s ninth Carmignac Photojournalism Award for the\ir project on the Arctic. Widel】y view】ed as 】one of the most enda\ng【ere】d 【ar】】eas in the world, the Arctic【 】is home to 】the Nenets - a nomadi【c】 group that make the yearly m/igration a\cross Nort【h【ern】 Russia. F【o/r \the first t【ime e】v\er, \their journey was i/nterrupted by melt/ing frost in 2018. K】ozyrev f】ollowed【【 their progress this year and bore witness 【to the impact【 t/hat global/ warming is h【avin\g on /their lifest/yle. Lohuizen,】 on the other h】【and, /visited various part\s of the【 w\orld,】 meeting with sc】ientists, envir\onmenta】lists and vulnerable com】munities /to find out ab】out the reality of/ 【what is happening to our m/elti】ng ic【e ca\p\s.\ Each photo in t\he e/xhibition shows the sta\rk reality facing t】his part o【f the world thank//】s to t\ourism, the depleti/on of gas an】d natural resources and heavy ocean p【oll/ution.More infoWords: Bianca /Barr\attShare this arti/cle 【 / More f】\rom lifebmGn

gB7c】While many citizens /across E/urope【 were celebrating Easter Monday,】 April /22 also marked】 Earth Da\y.【What 【is Earth Day?】Observed on 【the same date ev\ery 】ye】ar】,】 va【riou\s events are hel/d across the 【globe on Earth Day to d\emo【nstrate support for env】ironmental pr【otection.T\/he Ear】th Da\y Network now coordinates efforts【, worki【ng y/ear【-ro/und to 【solv/e clima【te chang/e, end plastic poll\ution, protect\ e\ndangered species, and enc【oura【】g】e the environment/al movement.Wh【en 】d【i【d】 it】 sta【rt?Peace activist John【 McConnell 【f\irst prop【o】se【d the idea of Earth Day /in 1969 at a 】UNESCO Con\ference in San F】rancisco.His goal was to //honour the Earth a】nd 】the co】nc【ept of peac【e on one day\ in the US, /which was【 first cele】brated on March 21, 19/70\ — 】t【he first day of spri/ng i/n the n【orthern he】/misphere.US Senator Gay】lo\rd Nels/on founded Ea【rth】 【Day one mont】h later on Apr【il 22/,\【 /1970, /after witnessi【】ng the rav/ages of the 1/969 mass】ive oil spill in San/ta Barbara, California.While it was【 o\riginally/ an】 Americ/an initiative, 】the concept was taken inter/n\ational in /1990,【 with events organized in 141 /co\untries.What events are h【/ap/pe【ning in Eu/ro【pe?Institu\tions 【across Eu】rope m/arked Ea【rth Day with va【rious ini【tia】】【\t\ives in 19\.The \Internat【iona】l Sc】hool of G】\en/eva in S【witzerland w/as set to /host a “green sale” and an organic food sale to raise money to/ plant trees on\ the school/ g】rounds.I\n Chisinau, Mol【/dova, the Gutta-Club — an or】ganisa】t【ion working mai/nly on educ\ation, energy, cli【mate and sust】ainable deve\lop【me【nt — host【ed a r【ange of Ear\th Da/y events including cle\an-u\p/ e【fforts in 30 villag【【es,】 a tree plant】【ing movement,【】 and the building of nesting boxe【s fo】r bir【ds.EC/O-】UNE\SCO in Dublin o\/rganised its annual/ ECO-Explorer C/amp for kids\ where child】ren 】aged 5-12 could 】explore the local urb【an 【ecology, take weather measurements, inves/tigate wildlife and d\iscover the city's g【reen spaces.W/【ha\t\ can I do?The U/nited Nat】ions published "T【he Lazy Person&r\sq】uo;s Gui】de/ to Saving\ the World", in which it lists actions people can take in line with \i【ts Sustainable Deve】】lopment Goals.The o【rganisation categorised the s\uggestions f【\rom 【lev【el 1 to le/vel 4, depending on whet】her the tasks were \at home, at work/ or i【n so】meone's local area.Here are s/ome\ suggest/ions f【r】om al\l four \levels:Save el\ectricity b【y pl\u【gging appl/iances into a power strip and turn】ing them off c/o】mpl】etely wh【en not in【 us\e, including your co【mputer.Stop 【pa】per \bank statem\ents and pay your bill/s onlin\e 】or via mobi】le【.Buy mini】mally packaged go\ods.】G/et a 】r\ug &mdash】; carpets 】and【 rugs keep your house 】warm and your the/r】m/ostat l【ow.Ta】ke short showers. B】\athtubs re/quire 【gallons more water than a 5-10 minute \shower.Com【posting\ food s【craps /can reduce climate/ impact 】while\ a/\lso recycling nutrients.【Let your hair and clothe/s d\ry natur】a/lly inste\ad of running a machine. If you do wa】sh your clothes, make sure t\he load is full.Eat l\ess meat, poultry, and fish. More re】sources are u\sed to pr】ovide meat than plants.Plan meals &mda/sh; use /sho\p/ping lists and av/oid imp/ulse\ buys. D【on&rsquo】;t succumb to marketin\g tricks\ th/at lead 【you t/o buy m\ore food t【h\an you need, p【art【icularly for perishable item【/s】.Bike【,\ wa\lk or take public t【ransport.】 Save the car tr】ips for when// you&rsq】uo;ve got a big group.Use a refillable water bottle an【d\/ /\【coffee cup.Share/ th】is articl\eShareTwee【\tSh】ares\endSh\are/Twee/\tSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShareSh【areSendShareSha【reYo】u might also li【ke 【 \ / / Ba【lance /'by disas【ter or design】9;: Why should we/ be worried by Earth Overshoot Day? 【| Euronews Answe【rs \ 】 \ 【 E/U&】#039;s youngest commission【e【】r on how to turn climate c【risis around 】 /】 / 【/ '【;Inc】redible win for nature': Plans\ \【to drill in G】reat Australian Bight abandon\ed \ More aboutEnvir】onm/ent】Environmental protectionEurope \ 】 Bro【wse today'\;s t/\agsDgwd

PPevTe】xt sizeAaAaIn th\e shadow of \t【he f】irst/ a】nnive】rsary of/ jo【urnalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 】murder an\d\ amid escalating tensions in neighbouring Yemen, Saudi Arabi\a has opened its /doors to tourism for 】the first time.The/ fac】t is,/ Saudi has been cut off from many West\erners until】/ no【w. A\ poor i【mage in the press, alon【\gside al】legations of human 】rights abuses have put some off the idea. /That’\s \not to mentio\n 】【【the dif【ficulties in getti\n】g a vi/sa】.Now, however/, the obstacle of the 】vis/a ha\s been /removed, after 【Saudi 【/announ/ce】d its new t】ourism scheme in Septembe\r. The new tourist v】isa【 allows visi/tors from 49 countries – includin\g 】all EU n/ations i】n 【addition 】to the US/, Canada, China, Japa【n】 and 】Rus【sia among other【s】 – t\o pay \on arrival for a 90-day tourism visa/.\ It comes at a cost of 440/ S【AR plus VAT, equivalent to £9/&eu/ro;106/【9.Saudi is turning t\\o tourism in place of oilEu\ronews / \Rachel Gr\ahamThe 】】tourism board hopes the n\e【w v【isa will make it easier for people \to\ discover the land for themselv/es. And it&rsquo【;【s fair to sa\y there /is much m】ore to/ 】discover than \many realise.Read mo\re |【An unfilt【ered【 g【uid】e to getti【ng a/round in】 Saudi A【rabiaMuch of Saudi Arabia/ /wa/s un】der【wa【ter 】mil\lions of 【years a【go, and it s】h/ows\ in the landscape wit/h r/ocks ju】tting out ac【ross th】e dese【【\rt, forming wha\t used to be shelv】【es and cor】al 【reefs. Meanw】hile, the Red Sea coast as it is now is 】\a sight simil/ar to that of the Maldives. There are more than\ /1,100 tin/y, and\ com【p】letely undevelope】d, 】【/is【\lands that】 【】are home /to w【onders【 of【 n/ature.Madein Saleh, near Al UlaEuronews / R】a【chel GrahamThe western coastline fe【ature\s 】】island】s reminiscent of the Mal/divesEuronews / Rachel【\ G】rahamBut for Westerners to unco/ver th\e s\ights and sounds of 】Sa/udi, t】】】hey&r【squo;d have to be convinced that either their negat\ive percept】ions have been ex】a//ggerated or that the country has changed. \So, how liberal【 is Sau【di Arab【ia a【】bout【 to /become in its bid 【】to e【nchant\】 /tourists? A\nd at what co/st?Crown Prince Mohammed B】in S\alman is\ 】said to be behind the drive /f/or Saudi to ditc】h【 its reliance o/【n oil,\ /an】d move tow\ards other form】s of】 in/com/e. A shining jewel of that 【plan is for Saudi Arabia/ /to/ be/come【 a hub for internatio/\nal tou\rism.Supe】r citi【esIt 【has【 experience of tourism as the site \of 【the world&rsq【uo;s\ largest/ pilgrimage si\te at Mec/ca, seeing nearly 1.9 million】 non-Saudi Musli/ms make the Hajj\ pil】grimage over /the course of just a few days la【st yea【r. But no【w, the coun\tr】y】 is gearing up\/ to position i/t【self as a \luxury destination】.It is spending hundreds of/ billio】n【s【 \on \new i/n\frastruc【ture and a trio of gig【aprojects th/ro\u【ghout\ the country to \m】ake it more appealing/ to disc\erning visitors.\ These 】audacious pl/ans include 】building Saudi Arabia’s fir】st ski slop/e ins【i\de Riyadh】&rsq\u】o;s upcoming Mall Of 【Arabi\a shop\ping 】cent/re, 】\and creating the Neom super cit【y on Saudi’s Re【d Se\a coast.What wil\l \soon b】e Neom is \cur\ren\tly part of 【an/ 800km stretch of coastline s\outh /】o【f t】he bord】er with/ Jordan. A\】s it stands,\ it /doesn’\t ye【t feature a single fiv】e】-star hotel or r/es/o】rt.M/ultiple so/urc】es \\t【old Euronews Living th\at the Saudi go】v】ern/ment】 was in “advanced talks&rdq\uo; /to allow】 alcohol in /the country, 】nea/ring\ the /stage of being “rea】dy to sign” agre】ements /permitting alco】】hol in resorts such as N【eom. Currently possessi\on of or trade in alcohol is prohibi/ted, /】leading to 【se\v】ere punishments including imprisonment fo\r those cau/g\ht flouting the rules【.Shou/ld thos【e new】 r\egu/lat】【i】o\ns com】e to fruition, bo\oze wil【l become jus】t a\ small pa/rt o】【f the attract】io】n.The gove\r/【n/ment has said it is c\omm】itted t/o maintaining S/audi&rsquo】/;【s \uniqu【e s【/el\ling point\【, which bring//s together landscapes like t\hose of the U/S’s grand canyon】, the Maldives&rsquo/;/ seas and 】ancient c】ultural attra/ctions. T/his\ 【would mean sustainable】 tou\rism manag【\ement and premium positioning, sa】/y offic【ials.Al Ul】a is set to become 'th\e world's biggest liv\ing mus】eum'Euronews /【 Rachel GrahamS】ustainability/“Once we identify an e/nvironme】nt, we pu/t a coastal management plan into place,&rd【quo; s【ays Captain 】Ahmed/【 Shaker, associate director of the Marina &【amp; Yac】ht Club at King Abdul/lah Economic Centr/e north of Jeddah.“So if we】 \find a be】/ach //w\here turt/les nest, it&】rsquo/;ll be/ of\f-limits except to very small【 n\umbers of conserv【ationist\s and eco-tourists w\ho’ll access the】m in a way that doesn’t distu【rb the wildlife. We’re e】xpecting sport fishing to becom//e a big\ part of the tourism push, and【 there i/t will b】e all about catc\h and r/elease.&rdquo】;Saudi Arabia plans to【 a/ttra\ct tour】\ists to th\【e Jedd】ah coastline for /sp/ort fi】shing \【and divingKAECAmaala is a zero carbon/ resort coming to Saudi A【r】abi\a's /west coastAmaalaShaker i/s passionate abo【ut p/reser【vin/g /\the ocean/s \surrounding hi【s home【land. “/Working】 a】s a scuba instructor in Sharm El Sh】e/ikh in th】e late 80s, I saw th/e transformatio【n a\s it became a dest/ination】 【for mass tour/ism and watched as the co】rals got so rui】ned, it wa\s h】ard】ly/ w/orth diving anymo\r\e. That’\s when 】\it b/ecame a nightlife resort instead, be【cau【se 【the n】atu【ral be/auty was gone】.”Inla\nd, a project【 named 【Amaala is ai/ming for a carbon n\eutra\l buil【d/ and final【 result. It is set to feature a 【mar】ine conservation/ \ce/ntre and state of/ the art h】ea/th facil【ities in addition to luxury, sol/a】r-powered ho/tels.R/ead more | How do you make/ 】a /】luxury tourist【 destin\ation zero carbon?T【he kind of pers【\o】n likely to /make use of these /facilities are advent】urers 】- those 【\a/ttracted by t\he culture and unknown qua】ntity t\hat makes Saudi Ar【abi【a a mysterious destination, says UK based tou\/rism co【【nsultant /Roger Goodacre.\The\ coast】al region of Tabu】k is set to b【ecome encom】passed by NeomEuronews / Rachel Graham"/Saudi 】is hardly i/n danger of be\coming a mass/ tourism destination," he says. "It's someon/e who wa【nts to explor【e【【 things they\【 haven't b\een able\ to before who will visit, and there 】will be some drawn by the/ Red Sea】 Coa\st. It's p】erhaps /【the 【last unspoiled di/ving d【estination of its kind on Ear\th."Cur【rently, he's working on a project to 】quadrupl【e the n【umber of pilgrims visiting Mecca \each year, /but sees n/o object to non-Musli\ms enj】oying\ it. "Most 】people don't let their political views】 colo\ur t】heir choi】ce of holiday destinations."/How Western】 wi\ll Saudi/ go?Tac\o Bell res\】taurants, Domino's 【pizza jo【in【ts, Dunkin' \Donu\ts coffee shops a】lr【eady \line/ the /streets【 o】f Riyadh/, provin】g the Saudi p\eople /have】 already develo\ped quite/ a taste for some Western \s\t\aple】s.Meanwhil】e/, liberalisation is well underw【/ay, according to Good】acre. "Th\e religi\ou/s police [the mutaween] d【on't have anywhere【 near as much po/w】er as they \used 【to," he】 tells 】】Euronews Living."S/ocially, it\'s consid/erably more relaxe】d now, es【pecially in Jeddah【 where you're less likel\y】 to see he/a【d 【coverings, a/nd more likely to see w】om】e/n【 driving, cycling】 a/long the prome【nades and mixing of\ sexes. I【t wou\ld all have been \unthinka】ble/ until r】ecently."Read mo/re |\Trio of \eco hotels to open/ n/ext doo/r t】o 【UN【E\SCO World Heritag】e siteThe r】e【pressive】 stat\e that 【many envision is/ open【 to further cha/nge, add】】s Ahmad A\l-Khateeb, c【ha】ir\man 【of the】 Saudi Commission for Tourism and Natio\nal Heritage.“Once you o/pen the doors, it’s ve\ry difficult【 to close \them 【once more,” he says. 】After all,【 the commission w/ant \visitors to be “surprise】d and【 delighted by the trea\【sures we hav\e to sha/re&rdq/u\o;. H】e counts among them\ “five UNESCO /World Heritage S/ites,\ a vibr/ant/ local cu】lt\ure and bre】athtaking natural beauty&\rdquo;.Ar/chi【tecture in t/he capital is 【thor/oughly mod【ern\/Amr AlMadani, CEO of /the【 Royal Com\missi/on fo【r AlUla, stresses that you h【ave to have 【li【v/\ed in Saudi Arabia long e\nough to see t/he change, but po】【ints \to lifting the【 】ban on【 w【omen driving l/ast year as a pivot】al moment.Now, he wan//ts 】to mak/e AlUla - \which form\ed t】he s/o/uth\er【n h/ub \of the ancient\ Nabatean civilisation - t【he “large【st living mu】seum in the world&【rdquo;. Opening to tourism for th【em【 means revealing【 a place th\【/at connects humans, culture and 】nature."We think of AlUla as \Petra plus," he sa/ys, referring to the】 Nab/atean c\api】tal region in Jord/an 【that has become a hub f】or hist【\ory b/uffs and tourists.And 【\th【e question of the coveri\ng u/p? It is per】】haps /one of\ th【e first images【 conjured for man】y when think of Saudi Ar【abia. However wearing the \abaya isn't manda\tory for f\oreign【 visitors【, says AlMadani. "But the type of tourist we're exp】ect/ing to attract is respectful of the cul】】/ture.&rd\quo;Ultimately, \opening the floodgates to tourism wh\ile maint【】ai【ni】ng/ respect 】for Saudi&r\squo;s cul/tural heritage and natu【ral env【ironment may be to】ugh. But it is the challenge its government ha【s chos/en. With their confidence 【bol\stered by the pre\mium p/rice po【int an/d curren】t【 dear【th of wat/ering holes likely to s\c【are /of/f bargain hunters, they【 may yet succeed\.【Madein Saleh, 【near Al UlaEuronews / Rachel Graha/mShare【 】this a\rticle 【【 More from placesUq0E

4YivText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesuSnH

xXCyCan 【econom\ic grow/th and protectin】g the env【【ironment go hand in hand? 】In this episode【】 of 】Bu】siness\ 】Planet】 Euronews travelled t】o A/ust\r\ia to look at the efforts whi/ch are underway to fost【er inn\ovati】on, transform industry and create su【st【ainable growth 】across Europe. "Sustai】nabl【【e econo/mic【 development /aims】 t【/o /reach a balanc【e between envir【onmental\ and climate protection】, qu】ali/ty【 of 】life and economic gr】owth. 】I【t's pos】sible to observ【e, through】 our em】pirical data, that【 the green econ【omy is a driver fo【r】 growth/. In the past fe【w\ 】】ye】ars, \the Austrian environmental technology 【industry has grown almost t\wice as fast/ a【\s the /economy /as a whole in re\cent years," Andreas Tschulik, Austrian environment minist】【/ry.The Eu\ropean Commission is invest】ing 】in】 EU industry for a modern, clean and fair/】 】eco\n】】om/y. One company w\hich epitomise【s this drive \is ECOP Technolog/ies, near V】ienna. The 【co】mpany 【manufac【/tur【【es rotatio【n heat pumps for industrial use. Using innovative techno【logy \the firm helps other companies to recover en\e/rgy and /】save cost【s whi\c】h 】in turn\ help\s protect the e\nvi\ronment【."With our rotation he/at pump we r\each i\n 【specific appl/ications return on【 inves\tm【ents 】with/in three to seve/n years and 【compared to \burning gas,/ but we save an/ enor【mous amoun\/t o【/】f CO2 and this is the reason why we get supp/o】rted by 】the EU th\rough the/ horizon 20 program," says \ ECOP's 】CEO, Bernha\rd Adler. 】 \ECO】P's /innovative work saw it win this y\ear's【 European Busi】ness Aw\ard for Environ\/m】e\nt."Innovation is the key to tr\ansform th\e】 current eco\nomic system 】into a gre\en economy. \/Wit【h】out inn【ov】ati】o\n/ we will n】ot be able to r/each our glo/ba/l climate protection goals. Abov】e average investment into research and 】development】 res【ults in above average grow】th/," in\sists Tschulig. ​ He adds, "\Our top envir【onm\ental po\licy goals are to cut greenhouse gas emissions and /r/educe /consumption.【 A lot o/f compan/ies realise【 this a】nd 【are/ ta/king a【/dvan/tage【 of the 】resulting bus/ines【s opportunit\ies. But t/】he /whole of socie】t/y is ben【efiting【 from thi\s, given t/hat many\ gre\en jobs have been creat】ed throughout the whole valu】e chain."&\#8203; 【 Top EU innovatio【n prioritiesEncouraging innovation and inve】stment to【 crea/te new \jobs and b\oost gr\owth has always】/ been a prior\ity【 for the EU.G/rowth cannot com/e a\t t\he cost of the environme【nt. We need sustainab/ility.Protection of the environment/ and 】sus/tainabl/e development both demand \in/nova\tio/n.Innovatio【n 】bridges t\h【e gap between research an\d the market, making ideas that pr\otect the enviro【nment comm\er【cially\ viable.T\he E/U org】anises the E【urope【an Busines【s 【Awards to recog/nise compan/ies putti】ng inn】】/ovati【on /【a\nd sustainable devel\opment at the heart of their busi】/ness acti/vities.】The a【wards are presented ev/ery two y【ears in five categ/ories: Manage/me【nt, Product and services, Process i【nnovat/ion, International business\ c【oo/peration and Business and bio/div【er/sity.The 2018 】Awar/ds w/ere presented on 14 November in Vienna, Austria.Sha【re thi【s articleCopy】/past\e the article video embed link below:Cop】yShareTweetSharesendShareTweetSh】aresendMoreHideShareSendS/hareShareShareS【endS】hareShareMo/】re aboutBusinessAustriaEnv】iron】mental p【/】/rotection Bro】wse today's ta】gsksCq

Ujt7Italian ban o\n】 p\lastic cotton 【buds comes\ 【/into effectqFBg

4G1zFinance going greenWRd1

PmNkG\r【eece \told to �/39;save your 【paradi\se as oi】l \compa【n【ies move infbR2

Y4QiFor 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sN3zI

1.DIqT\This week, in a quiet street\ in【 the Norwegian har【bour town o【f Bergen, officials from E】U member states \【an】d No【rway/\/ will hole up in the\ Fisk【【er/idirektorate】t, or Fisheries D\irectorate, to decide the size of the fish 【pie to【 get divided \out between them from so-called &【ld】quo;shared \stocks.” This &ldqu【o;consulta】tion,” as /it is known, happ\ens a【way from pub】l/ic scr/utiny. Yet】, fishing indu/st】ry l【obby【ists are a【llowe/【d i/n where they get to 【cosy up t】o d\elegat【es, while civil so】ciety re/presentatives are 】- qu\ite l】itera【lly - /left out in the cold. These】 annual gat/herings are even more secretive th/an the【 EU AGRIFISH \council meetings, which were re【cently【 investigated by th【e E/U 【Ombudsman 【and found to/\ be】 /】lackin【g in transparency.EU-Norway【 consultations c/o/nsiste】ntly res\】ult in agree////me\nts to /continue overf【/i】shing. T】his is in no s\\mall part d\ue to a be\wilde\ringly flawe【d a【pproach】: by assuming the scienti【fi】c advice fo【r maximum】 sustai【【nable c【at【【che【s a\s a /s\tart\ing point and then negotiating upwa】】rds. /The 】EU \commit\ted to phase out overfishin/g【【 u\nd】e【r the r/ef】orme】d/ Common【 Fish】eries P/olicy (CFP【) by 2\【015 or, at the absolute\ 【l/atest, by 20. Ye】t【 while the act of catch】】ing\ too many fis】h occurs at\ sea, it is insi\de meetings like/ t/h】is /【where overfishing is \shamelessly agreed up/on and a】pproved\.On 16 Decembe\r in Brussels, EU fisher】ies ministers【 will follow】 up on 】the Norway \“consultations” at the an】nual AGRIFISH Co\uncil meeting, 】where quotas/ f\【or 】/the 【Nort】h East Atlantic w/\ill be fought over into the wee hours \of the night】/. Acc/ording to all the signs, \this year they will again agree\ to overfish several key stocks.The 【recen/t gro/und-breaki/ng IP】/BES Global Asses】sment Report on Bi】od/iversity and Ecosystem Services e【stimated 【humanity is threa【ten【ing a million species with extin【cti【on. Over/fis【hin】g rem/ains the bigges/t imp【act on our【 o/cean. Rebecca【 Hub】bard 】 【 】 \Programm\e Di【\rector at Our Fish The sig/nals? F\】i/sheries ministers /【/have s【\et fishing quo/tas abo【ve\ scie/ntif【i【【c a/dvice in six ou\t of every 10 c【as】es since the CFP was reformed i\n 2013. Th\e AGRIFI/SH Council v【ery rarel【y 【sets fishing quotas at more sustainable leve】ls than the EU Commission proposes. The 【EU】 Commission’s pro\posal for a number of\ North Eas】t Atlantic fish populations for 202【0 are a】lread\y above the scientific a/】dvi\ce, and the c【ontinu】ed politi\cal/ delay \】from\ fisheri】es m】inist/【ers has wors】ened the situ\ation, me【an【ing ministe【rs/ \are now fa】ced 】wi/【th【 proposal/s for dr】ast【ic cuts to some fish such as\ the iconic North S【ea cod.Not on//ly are mini】sters presid】ing over fishing/ limi/ts for/ a declining number of 【fishers\, they are overseeing 【the/ on\going decline of our marin【e resou【rces /instead of making sustainable 【resource mana/gement dec\i\sions 【that would improve the health of th【e ocean and/ secure the futur\e of f【isherpeople an/d 】coastal 】communities.T【\he recent gr\ound-brea\k/ing IPBES Globa\l Assessment Report on Bio】diversity an【d Eco【s【ystem \Services 【【estimated humanity\ is thre】atening a /mi\llio/n species with extinction.\ It also conc】lu\ded that the b】iggest threats \to na】ture are f【rom change】s to l】and\/sea use and over-exploitation. Overf/\ishing\ remains the 【bi【ggest \impact【 on our ocean.But re【m】】oving \the impact/ of overfishing\/ can restore oce/an health /and inc【r】ease/ \its capacit/y t/o m/itigat\e, an\d a【d【a【p\t to, the impacts of climate/ change【. It is therefore a key form/ of c【limate action. This has starte\d to permeat【e in】to p】olicy\. On 19 November【, the EU Council\, i\】n response t【o t/he 】recent/ IPCC Special/【 Report on\ the O\c/ean 】and Cryosphere, appe\ale/d to the EU Commission for policy options in t/he new Gr\een Deal, wh\ile st【a】t】ing the need for 【urgent action 【to \addres】s】 the incr\easin】g threat of climat/e b/r】eakdown to【 the o】\cean an【d marine l】i】fe.So, missing【 the deadline of 20/2/0 puts the EU in di/fficult territory\. It【 places EU fisheries 】ministers in direct】 cont\ravention of/ th/e 【laws that they【, or the【】ir pr/edecesso【rs, 【created a/nd signed up to, and in poten/tial conflict with the】 climate a】ction taken by othe【r ministries within their\ own gove\rnments.When EU fisheries】 】】ministers set annual\ f】\ishing l/imits 【for 2020 on 16 and 17 Decemb/e【r, they must/ deliver on internati/onal/ an/d EU obligations t【o 【end /overfishing. 】 Rebecca Hubbard / Programme Dire\ctor at O\ur Fish 】 / Norway, to】o, h\as inv\ested】\ a great【 deal in/ pro【jectin【g itself \as\ a climate and anti-overf【is【hing cha\【mp/ion,/ when in actu/al f】【act, it/ too, is hypocrit\ical 【on both is\sues】【. On climate, Nor/wa\y 】has made big commitments】 】to become a ‘l\ow-carbon 【so【c【iety&rsq】u/o; but in reali/ty, emi】ssions are decreasing much slower. On】 ov】erfishing, Norway signed up\ to the 【Sustai【nable Development Goals】 【to en/d overfis/hing by 2020, bu】t on【 the water, they received a quota in 2019 large enough to plunder a massive 164,000 tonnes of fish above s\cientifical】/ly advised sust\ainable level\s (equivalent to 21% of its share/d s/toc\k quota with the E【U).W/hile N】orway\ and the EU discus【s h\ow best】 to continu\e ove\rfishing in Bergen】, further south, delegates at the COP25 climate meeting in Madrid focus【 on the ocean, 【in what has been labelled the “Blue COP.&rdq/u/o; With states under pressure to ste/p up their commitments to action on climate, discus\sions will be focusing】 on why there is not more ac/t【ion on oceans【 when【 we know what needs to be done. And it ca】n be done relatively quickly/, a\s 】the longer-【term (but cr】【itical) ac】tion\ of slashing car\bon emis】sions gets underway?Late】r th【i【s month, EU prime min【i\sters】 have an op】portu】nity to g\o public with a】 cle/a/r and \deliverable climate emergency acti/on. W】hen E/U fisher【ies min【isters】 set annual fis\hing limits for 2020 \o】n 16 and 17 December, they must de】liver on int】e【rnat【ional and EU o】bligations to/ end overfishing.Rebecca\ Hubbard i\】s t/he Progra\mme Direct\or/ at Our Fis【h.____________Are you【 a recognised expert\ in you/r field】? At E【uronews,/ we belie】ve all views matt\er. Co\n】t\act us at view@euronews.com to send pitches or submis/sions and be【 p/ar/t of the con】/versation.Share this articleShareTweetSh\aresendShareTw/\eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendShareShar【eSha】reSe\【ndShareShareYou might also/ like //】 \ / The EU’s G【reen】 Deal p/\lan/s to /restore nat\ure mu/st include our largest e/cosystem - th】e ocean ǀ /Vie【】w 【 / \ 【 \ / 】 】 Scien】t\ists have\ emb\arked from Norway【/ on the lo/ngest-ever exped\itio/n to the 】Arctic / / \ 【 \ \ \ How s/mall sca\le fi\sheries saved Da【nish f】ishi/ng communities Mor】e aboutf【/ishingNorwa/yEuropean U/nionFisheryEnvironmental protectionCOP /5 M】a\drid Browse today's tagsxRZS

2.70s4We /spea】k 】to【 s/oci\al \anthropologist Mathilde Hojr【up】 Autzen abou/t how a Dani/s】h fishing c【ommu/nity】/ is now t【hriving a【fter ne【arly bei\n【g\ wiped out by f/ishing /quotas】.【Share this articleCo】py/paste the article video embed link below:Co\pyShareTw\eetSha【\resendShareT】w】eetS【haresendMoreHideSha【/reSendShar/eShareShareSendShare/ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 Depleted fish sto【cks can’t wait. The】 E】U and Norway need to commi【t t【o ending overfishi【ng now ǀ V/ie/w 】 【 】 【 \ Activist/s are rais【in\g funds to sav】e【 Danish wooden boats / / //More aboutF\i/sheryEnvironmen/tal【/【 protectionDenmar/k 】 \ / Most\ viewed 【 \ 】 // 】/ What influence on cl\ima\te 【】is the /c\orona/virus lockdown r/eally having? \ \【 The new AI system safeguard\ing premature babies from i】nfecti\o【n \ 【 【 】 Messenger RNA: the m】olecule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer / 】 \ Apple and Google say they'll wo/rk together to trace sp【read of coronavirus via sm【ar\tphones 【 【 】 】 How EU funding is 【chan】g】ing the f】【ac【e【 of Latvi】an i【nnovation\ 【 】 Browse today's t/agsswWi

3.8JsETex/t sizeAaAa】Dutch/ ad/ve\n【tu/rer Wiebe Wakker left the Nether】lands in an\ e】lect】ric car, the \B\lue Bandit\ \on\ the 15th of March 20/1【6 to /complete/【 th/e long/es】t \journey in an ele【ctric car ever【 recorded. His goal /w】as to sp/read /th】e world o/f sustainab/i【lity a\round the wor【ld, w】hile inspire, educat】【e\ an\d accelerate the t【ransition to a z\ero c\arb】on future. A beje/gyzés megt】eki【ntése /az Inst【agramonWiebe Wakker 】/ Plug Me In (@plugmeintravel) &a【ac】ute;【l\tal megosztott bejegyz&\eacute;【s, &A\ac】u\te\/;pr 7., 2019, időpont: 1:24 (\PDT idő\;zóna szerint)To bring about this mission he re【lied on the kindness and help of the p\eop【le around the glob/e, hence his/ in/itiation, called 'Plug Me/【 In', has /bec/ome th/e collaborati/on b\etween p】eople. Eventu】ally,\ those contributing by offering f\ood, accommodation or 】electricity, wer】e the ones choosing /the path that he ha/d to take. Hence,】 he was sent to Ita【ly via】 Germany and Switzerl/a\nd, after that to Sc【a/ndi【navia to eventuall\y \reach the Nort】h Cape and go \back south vi】a Russia, t】h【e Baltic States, Poland【 a【nd U\kraine.】 Followin】g that he hea\de】d to Iran and【 kept goin【g un【til Sydney, Au\stralia/.Cl】ick on th】e video abov【e to learn/ 【more abo\ut this adventure.Share this】 article More from placesLkgJ

4.EXS2Lisbon k【icks-off year as\ Europ/ean Green Capital 20200ske

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YF1RText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesfpMm

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3iiAText siz【eAaAaStar//ting】 a new business/ i\s an/】 exc【iting time, as you emb\ark on\ your entrepr】eneur【ial/ fut【ure w【ith passio【【n and/ dete】rminat【ion\. For many of u【s, n/ew ventures【 often have sust】ainability as a focus. Whether it/&rsqu【o;s【 a dr【ink, a/ clothing brand, jewellery or a café【;, many of us want commit 【to a sustainable ethos as part of our /brand. But what about our //own sustainable effort/s? After all, 】you can’t set up an eco-/focused b\rand and then n\ot pay attentio/n to the sustainabili】ty】 of your own 【working\ day. We asked experts f\or advice o/n how to be a susta】inable】 start-u\p【, from day o】ne\. Make your launch party and gifting\ susta】inablePl【anni】ng an event/ and 】gifts for customers to welco【m【e your n【ew \‘business/ baby&rsq\uo; into/ the【 world is all very well, but you n/eed to do it in 【an /eco-friendly way. Bec E/van】s is author of How to Have a Happy Hustle. She advises, “m】ove\ away fro/m bub【ble wrap envelopes, and th】ink about bi\odegradable \goody【 bag/s – and no glitter balloo/ns! 】/Think about【 plastic in gi/fts and plas\tic waste when giftin\g. It&r\squo;s a】bout showi【ng intention &nd\ash; when you set up a \business\ it’s abo\ut building a community \and workin\g w\ith ea【rly users. Think ‘do【es t【he wor/ld really n】ee/d this?’&rdq\uo;.R/ela】t【ed | 9 susta】inable economy startups a/【i】ming to\ cl【ean up o/ur future 【Make su】stainability\ a &ls】quo;/given’, not a &lsquo/;must】 do/’Jesse Tran and So\n Chu are fellow students from Vietnam who\ 】are s/tar】t】i\ng their own trainer bus】iness and their p】roducts are made f】rom recycle\d coffee cups. \Stu【dying】 in Finland, t【hey saw 】clear】 diffe/rences in 】the way thi】n\gs wer】e produced and /the/ sustaina\ble】 the way of life. The【y&rsq】uo;ve channelled /that into\ their【 brand, RENS. The pair started using an organic cott【on bu\t【 realised this would have/】【\ an environmental impact an】/d so switch】ed to a\ new fabric.\】 &l/dquo;As /millennia【ls, for 【us sustainability shou\ld be a given\,&rdquo/; sa/ys Jess/e. “We want t】o p【lay a 【role as ambassa/dor/s &nda】sh; it【&rs\quo;s /easier to liv【e a sust/ainable life in Finland!”/Rel】ated |The brands launching sunglasses mad/e fr\om human hair, milk bottles \a】nd coffee waste View this post on I\ns】ta【gramRens are【 best sh】ared with \frie【nds! #renshipA post shared by/ Rens Ori\gi【n\al (@rensoriginal) on Aug 19, 2\019 \at 9:0H\alf of mille/nni【als would tak\e a pay /c\ut to save the plane\t/a\m P/DT【Think ab/out【 the entire prod/uction chainSo you&/r】squo;ve c/hosen your start-up./ Now to find】 a way to produce】 the 【product】. Sustaina\bility needs to be considered from start /to 【f\inish. Paul Turton i/s the Man】aging Dire】ct\or at Pact, a lead\ing speciality coffee s\erv】ice. He reveals that \they know customers are more likely/ to choo/se a brand or product that h】】【as【 purpose at the he\art of the business, so you should 【consider making this a k】ey /part of your company proposition.“S/ustainability is one 【of our\ core values, from t/he \farming wor】kfor/c】e in t\he co/untries/ w】【e buy our/ coffee/ from, to the /far/ming pra\ctices, ethics, shippin/g【, wa【/rehous】e【\s and roasting of the co】ffee,” he says. &l】dquo;It wouldn't be r】ig】ht to ask peop/le to work in 】a【 way that doesn't s】how us up】\holding our own standard/s - /no ma/tte/r the 【size of our busines\s.&rdqu\o;Jesse and【 Son fr\om Rens agree that their biggest tip【 is to 】find 【a g/ood/ sustainable base】. They work /from Aalto universit】y. &ldq】uo;Th【e lights are/ all aut/omat/ic, and\ everything is optimis/ed【/\,” sa】ys Jesse.Is your office space susta/i/nability-f【r】iendly?According to Bec Evans, “happiness is the j\ump】ing-off】 point【 【【for【 becoming a\ &lsq【uo;si】\d】e h/ustler’, and one of】 the reaso/ns si/de hus\tles are growing 】so 】much is \b】ecause you】 can work /from【 /anywhere\.” So\ that/&】rsquo;s a g】ood place to s\tart 【&n】dash; is yo】ur chosen place /of work】 sustaina】ble? Whether it’s at home】, a 【co/-w】ork/ing【 space o\r ren/【ted of\fic\e, y\ou need】 t\o c\onsider everything from the recycling p】\olicy to energ/y use.Susan Steven\s, /a CEO and Founder o【f/ 【M/a/de 【with R【espect ad/ds, “balancing between business objectives /and sus【tainability is ve【ry hard】 in the modern wo【】r【ld. \Our current【 business \model i/s b【ased \on con\】/sumerism, brands fighting for more an\d more】 sales, making customers buy thing【s they don【’t n【e】ed and have \t/【o th\row t【hem awa/y 】i/n a mon】\th or two.\ App】r\oxi\m】ately 1.3 bil\lion tons o/f 【wa【ste is 】prod】uced globally each year, this numb【er is ex【pected to increase to 2.2 billion tons p/\e/【r year by 2025】. This is alarming.”R】elated /| 5 s】tunning examples/ of/ g\reen architecture around the worldCommit to /recyclingThis may f\ee\l li\k\e /a more obvious one,\ but recycling can get forgotten 【when \you&rsquo/;re wonderi/ng abo【ut the provenance of the /cotton for those new bags you’re mak【ing\. Keep/ a kee【n eye on the re\cycling \opt】ions at your wor【kplace and of your prod\uct, expert【s sa】y. Paul Tur】to\n/ adds, &ld【quo\;it&rs】quo;s good 【to get into good /habits fr【om t/he start, then when the busi\ness/ gro】ws, it’s already ingrained in t】he cult/ure/. People don&r\squo;t o\ften r】ealise【 you can 】even \recycle used coffee grounds, it’\s best\【\ to seek out/ sup/pli【er/s【 who 】can help you do this, we use First Mile\ Rec【\ycling】 a\n【d Bio-Bean 【or simply \get a compost【 bin in the o【ffice.&r/dq/uo;First Mile founder】 and CE\O, Br】uce Bratley, adds, “when it 【com】es to recycling, it【's【 i】mport\ant to remember that no【t all was【te companies deal wit\h wa】ste in the same w【ay. 】It'\s essent【ial t\o ide\nt/ify one tha\t will\ continue you】r sustainabi\li【ty effo】rts aft【er you/r waste leaves yo\ur pr】emises to 【avoid it ending up in landfill sites where it will pr【o【duce green】h【ouses gases, such as metha】ne.”\Fi【】nd people who】 are on the sa\me sustainab】ility /page as \you\Wo/\rking with like-minded peop【le will mean y【ou】 develop \a st】rong sustain】ability】 mantra across the d\ay and into the future. David Ke】lly, Gener\al Manager \for \Eu【rope, Middle East and】 Africa a【t Deputy】, a co【mpa】\ny /that w\orks with】 lots of start-ups, s\ays, &\ldquo;to grow/ sustainably and /re/tain talent, you need/ to b】rin\g people on the j】ou/r/ney with you.】 Pay th/em pro【perly a【nd\ on time and prove wor】k w/il/l fit into their\ lif【e. In/ve\sting【 in tools that allow you to /d】o【 thi】s wi\l【l bu】ild 【trust amongst a dedicated work【f【】o【rce who /will be your en\gi】/ne fo/r grow/th.”/Buy 【second】 hand\ supplies and th】ink about packagingHow exciting is it when yo】u】 start\ a ne【】w business t【】o 【go all out on the stationa/ry, fun new pens, plant pots, 】desk ch\intz and \fancy envelope【s? Right? B】ut all these things are sustaina\bi【lity nightmares. You 【know a【bo/ut fast fashion, but you also ne】ed to【 b/e awa\re of &ls】quo\;fast stationary’\./ Step away from the p/en\s - you’\ve /go】t lots at home already./A/nd that goes for /machines as\ \well as pens, adds Jason Dow\nes, MD at PowWowNow,】 &ldquo\;when businesses are sourcing /off】ice】 equipme】nt, the/y sho】ul\d s【eek appliances with \a】n ENERGY 】STAR label, which【 indica\tes that the equipment\ has achiev】ed ener/gy efficiency \sta【ndards set by the EU./ 】Computers, for example, us/e 30-65 percent les\s electricity, while there are also\ greener alternatives for a lo【t of t】echno】l\ogy, such as/ energy-【efficient l\i\ghtb\u】lbs or solar-pow\ered】 smart】 speakers.&】【rdquo/;】Ros【alind Rathou【se run】s a s】ustainable cookery \school.】 She says, “when setti】ng up/ the \office of your ne\w bus\iness or start-】up,\ don&\rsquo;t be tem/pted to buy everythin/g new/. 【\Recycle where you can, use Fo【\rest/\ Stew/a】rdship Cou】ncil produc【ts and/ choose s\ustainable energy provider】s. Incorporate 】sustainability processe【s from d\ay one an\d emphasise/ the im【portance of waste management and re】ducin/g plastic.”Think about y【our energy supplierBills【 aren’t the mo\st glamorou】s t】/】opic, but choose the right ene\rgy sup】plier; you could save money as well as the p\lanet. B/ruce Bratl\ey ex/plai\/ns, “there i【s a growing】 r】ange 【of fully renewable energy pro\viders that 】can /pow【er your busi】ness withou【t creatin】g 【/extra/ greenhouse】 gas emissions, and even green web【 hosti/ng companies with renew【abl/e energy a】nd carbon offsetting s】ch【emes. Bu【sinesses can\ sav/e resourc\es】 by ensu【ring th】at they're signed up to pa【perle【ss【 billing for all of t\h】eir bills.【 Devel/oping gre【en habits in the 【workplace is/ easy\ and ca\n have a \signi】fica【nt impa】ct, f\or exampl\e, m【akin/g sure lig\hts and screens aren't being left on】 needlessl/y, using publi\c transpor】t to】 /g】et to me\etings and making sure e【veryo\ne \has easy access to】 【recycling bin/s.”Th】ink\ abo【ut em【otiona\l susta【inability, tooOnce you】’ve done /all you can】 to be sustain\able with the pr【acti/cal things, you need to th】ink about your own mental well【being, to【o, /adds Bec Evans. “A\ lo\t of people set up side h【ustles because/ they 】are solving problems in【 some way a/nd I s】peak to【 a l\ot【 of peop\le in areas of health \and mental wellbeing who fee\l the pro】ble\ms 】/they see a/ren’t bein【g solved. /Talk to customers /and /ask/ them wh\at they think./ Be t\rue\ to your values. If sustain【ability is something that mo/tivat/es y】ou then it&\rsquo;s important to】 check y【ou’re in 】l】/i【ne with your 【/own va\lues.”W】ords:/ Jenny S【ta【llardShare/\ this article M【o/re from lif/eZR6T

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Ui3eScientists in【 J\or/dan have discov【ered that corals \in the 【Gulf of Aqab【a are\ resisting the rise \in】 water tempe/ratures.Across the\ w/orld/, coral reefs are【 dying at rapid rates due\ to overfis\hing, pol【lution an/d climate ch】ange.It&rsq/uo;s est/i/mated that\ half the of earth\’s r【/eefs have been lost.This figure is thought to be critical, considering that corals are the habita\t of /one in fou【r 【of all marine species.【/Furthermore, up to half of the w/orld&rs【q【u/o;s oxygen co【mes】 fro【m t【\he oceans and the cor\a【l r\eefs wi/【thin.The exact/ reason /for the corals’ resilience in Jordan is s【till unknown, but some analys\t/s b【eli【eve tha\t t/he creatures【 evolved d/ur\ing/ the \last ice age of more tha【n 20,000 years ago.Samp/le/s of c/or/als in Jor/dan used for【 analy/sis】Doctor Fuad Al【\-Horani, professor of coral 【bi】ology and ecology at the //University of\ Jordan, ho\pes that the marine】 inverteb】ra】tes【 【may one-day be the ke】\y to re-pop/ulating th】e world’s\ dyi】ng reefs.“There are tech【niques -/ we can propagate corals," he says. "We can climatise them to c/on/ditions available to them in t【he other 】seas. So, o/nce we grow 】them, w】e can send them abroad where/ they【 ca【n grow them into 】dete【riorated areas or damaged 】r】eef areas./&rd】quo】;Doctor Al Hor/ani wor/ki/ng on c【orals in JordanTOURISM & EC【ONOMIC DEVELOPMENT\ STIL/L J\EOPARDISE AQABA RE【\EFSSpanni】ng【 a distance of 2】7 kilom】etres,/ the s/l/ither】 o\f coastland】 calle】d Aqab/a【 is/ Jordan&/rsq\uo;s only sea-outlet.Despite glimm\ers of hope, the port【\ city&/rsq\uo;s coral remains\ in dange/r, wit】h glo【bal dev【elopment and pollution threatening its surv】ival.Jordan&r】squo;s【 coastland and 】only portTo enc\ourage【 economic】 d【ev/e【lop】ment, whi/lst p\rotecting the re\【efs, i/s therefore a con/【stant c/】hallenge f/or the Jordanian authorities.】Aqaba\ is a major tourism hub which we【lcomed around 100,000 v\isito\rs last year. D/ue to t/he sector&rsqu【o;s expansion, Jordan&rsquo】;/s only 【port 【w】as/ re【locat/ed to】 the si/te 【of one of Aqa/ba&r/squo】】;s lar【gest reefs in 2006/.The governmen【t, w/ith \th/e help of the United Natio/ns, worked to save a portion of t【he t/housand-year-old 【【reef【 by r】/elocatin【g\ t【he coral two miles f】】urther \【alo/ng the coastline】.Co【ral r/eefs in Jo\rdan being r/\eloc/【\atedAccord/ing to Neda/l Al Ouran, He/ad of】 \th/e Environment【, Climat\e Change and Disaster Risk Reduc\tion of th】e United Nations Development/ Programme, /the/ replantation far】ed mu/ch better than \expec【】ted.&】ldquo;We had great】 success,” he says. &ldquo【;Lucki】ly, we got】 a grow】th【 ra/te\ of more \t【han 85 per cen\t,】 w】hich is unique.\ Globally, you would fin\d 【the average growth rat\e af【】ter tra/nspl】antation and translocation would 】be 65\】.”Eco-dive\rs in the region l】ike Abdullah Al Momany, howe/ver【, believe that much more still/ n】】eeds to be done.He is fearful that the relentless rate o】f progress and de】velopme】nt is thre【at【ening to compro】mise the re】al draw of the area/, the re/efs.&ldqu】o/;Here in Aqaba, our \big/gest pr\oblem is us affec/ting【 the marine【 environment as humans,&rd\quo; he says. &ldquo\;I think the government need/s to enforce the law, do more awar【enes\s program【m】【es, and/ do m/ore effort/ in /protect】ing the marine life.&rdqu/o;Share this arti】cleCopy/paste th】e ar/tic【l【】】e video embed lin】k【\ below:CopyShareTweetS【haresendSh/ar【eTwee/tSharesendM【oreHid\eSh/areSendShareSh【\ar【eShareSendShareShareYou m\i/ght【/ also lik】e \ \ 【 /Rain, flood【s and confused se\als: Inside/ An】\tarcti】ca's warmest-ever summ/e】r 】 \ / \ 】 / C】limate migrants: How even\ rich Bavaria ca/nnot provide sh】elter from glo/bal warm】in\g 】 【【 / 】 【 】 Living i【n \a ghos\【t town: Mee/t the Moldovans w/ho refus\e t】o b】e climate m【igra【nts 】 【 M\ore abou】tGlobal warmi/ng and /climate changeEnvironmental pr/otectionEcologySeaJordanHot TopicLearn more about \ Global 【warmin【g an\d climate change Hot TopicLear\n/ mo】r】】e about Global warming and clima【】te change / Browse today's【 tagsi175

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RK6wIt 】is one of the most popula/r destinations for /tourists and one of the most famous islands in the world but its 70,Family-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net wider0 inhabit\ants l】ive under the real threat of a pos/sible earthquake or a vol】canic eruption &md【ash; with【 no \evacuation plan【 set up.Ischia 】is on\【e of the pearls of the N\e【apolitan archipelag】o.\ Lar\ger th】【an Capri】 a/n\d Pr】ocida, 】its tourism has d【eveloped thanks to its morphological peculiarities and its volc\anic o/rigin【s. Even\ i】n winte\【r, the /elderly【 savour thermal treatments while younger and 】adventurous visitors take delight in climbing Mount Epome\o — Is【chia's peak that/ rises on /the【 slopes of 】an a【ctive s\ubmarin\e volcano whose last eruptio【【n da】\tes back to 1302.Walking aroun【d the si【x towns scattered a【roun【d the /islan/d, it \is impossible 【\not t/o no\tice// the sma\ll clouds of white smoke rising from t/he/ ground, emanating fro【m fumaroles o/r cracks in the earth th】at emi【【\ts off st】eam】 a\nd gas."Ischia is a volcanic island/, /the po】rt itself is o/n an ancient crater" explains Francesca Bianco】, director of the Nap】les Sectio【n of 【t】】he National Institute of Geophysics \and Volcano【logy's】 Vesuvius 【Observatory. The INGV【 moni【/tors vari\a】tio】ns in the param/eters \of control in the Neapolit】an volcanic distric\t, /an area that includes V/esuvius, Ischia and the Phlegraean 】Fields."At the m【oment \we are not 【recording an active volcanic dy【namic for \Ischia —\ I mea】n 【that the volcano is activ】e \but there are /no ano【malies. Instead,/ we are wit\ne\ssing a phase of lifting \an\d we\ have raised the alert l【evel【 for the Campi Flegrei," she\ added.'We live on fire'The underwater vol【can】o /is t】herefore 【no\t the imme\diate concern of researchers but I】sch【ia mu/st still face the threats of seismic mov】ements indirectly linked /【to its presence.I【n August 2017, the island was【 hit /b】y /【an /earthquake t【h【【at killed two people, injured more than 40 others, and destroyed man【y hous】es."We cannot】 predict earthquakes but \w】e know the seismi【c his】to/ry【 of the i\sland," Bianco continued. "The 2017 event i】s not\ linked to m【agm\/a【tic phenomena but we kno/w that, due】 to the presenc\e of the volcano, a】/nd its w/eigh\t, the isl】and is low\e/r【ing causing fr/act\ures. It is obviou/s that v】olcanic dynamics increase the seismic risk 】of【 Isc/】hia."The earthquake al/so highlighted just how difficult it can be to ma\na/ge an emerg\ency on the island. That ni\ght ab】out 20,000 people 【&mda/sh; l/ocals a【nd tourist【s &mdas\h; came to the\ port 【to be ev】a】cuat【ed but there we【re not enough ferries.Neverthe【less, th\e Ischitans do no【t seem to \worry t【oo m\uc\h a】【nd\ f】ace the/ risk 】with a t/ouch of typic\ally Ne【apol】ita\】n fatalism."We literally l/i/ve on f】ire, we p【ut ourselves in the hands of the Eternal Father, what/ 【else shoul【d we do?" an elderly gentleman, wh】o /sells cheeses and mozzarella on the roadside/, s/aid."You see,【 we 】are surrounded by the 【sea, 【where shoul】d we go? If there is an】】 eruption we die on t\he island or at sea, it\ is impo】ssib】le to 】leave he\re qui\ck/ly," a【nother inha【bitant said.'No integrated plan/'Fabio Matter\a, from the local Ci/vil \Pr\ote【ction, told Euro【news \that "there is no i\ntegrated plan【 on the is//land】 fo/r erup\t/ions and【 earthquak\es," despite【 the fact /that "th/e 2017 /】shoc/k ca【u\ght】 us comp\letely un【prep\are/d【.\""There is no in】/tegrated plan of the islan】d for】 eruptio】ns and earthquakes. 【The shock of 201】7 has caught us 】completely unprepared," explains 【Fabio Mat\ter【a of t】he local Civ】il Protection, while 】he\ sh【】ow\s me the small opera/ting r\oo【m 】o/bta【ined in an a/ncient therma/l centre used for ot【her functions/."Th/e Campania】 region has recently【 issued a tender for the municipalities to finance 】evacuation plans. Now 】every singl\/【e【 muni/】c【ipality should work out its /own plan,"\ he】 sa\】id, labelling it "nonsense""If t】he/re is 【a disaster i】t will involve the 【whole island and/ the/ strategy 【shou【ld be common," he concluded.Fran\cesco Emilio Borreli】, regional councillor for the/ Green party has 【been critica\l of the lack o】】f pre\paredness for years."】The 【three a\reas obs【erv】ed by【 the /INGV 】a】r\e【 very urbanised,"\ h】e flagged. "Vesuvius inv/olv【es】 700,000 people, there i】s\ an evacuation plan but the exercis】es】 are no】 longer carried【【 \out.】""In Pozzu/ol】】i (Campi Fle/gr/ei) they have created an ev】acuation plan and h\a/ve begun to 】do/ some test【s but we ar【e v】ery f【ar from the possib【ility of actuall\y saving 500,000 people. In/ Ischia/ there app】e/ars to be 】little interest from anyon【e,/ perhaps t/hey think\ tha\t\ it is impos/sible to save i/ts【】 inhabitants,/" /he went 】on.Men \vs naturePhe【nomena such as 【/ear/thquakes and volc/a【/nic eru/p】tions are often 【\unpredictable and dep\e】/nd on nature but some \of the serious consequenc\e】\s of the earth/quake \of 2017 can be attributed exclusiv\ely to human action.T【he volc/an【i\c areas/ of the Neapo【lit】an territory have face】d w/\ild urbanisatio】n over th/e years with administra/tio\ns that rarely managed to opp\ose buildi/ng sp\eculation.Vesuvius, Campi F/leg\r】ei and 】Ischi\a are home to over 1%】 of the Ital/ian\ popula【tion, exposed\ 】【to pos\sibl】e cat/astrophic ev\e/nts \without the p\ossibility of ra【pid eva】cuation.A well-known risk that did no/t prevent the pop】\ula】ti【on of Is/chia from 【growing ex/ponentially from 23,511 inhabita【nts in\ /1861 /t/o 34,201 in 196/1, and 64,031 in 2016.Over the /l】ast 】50 years】, urbanised areas on/ the】】 island ha】ve g/rown from 9% of the 【/whole/ territory \to 30%, a figure thr【ee times highe\r \than the nation【al average,\ accordi【ng t/o researc/h【ers from the U【niversity of L'Aqui\la.\/【 Ev【en \tourism【, after a brief decline following the e\arthquake, is g【rowin/【g ag【ain, with over 3 mill】ion ann\u/al visitor】s."There【 are\ d\oze\ns of magnit【ud\e 4 earthquakes i】n Italy. The one in Ischia o】f 2017 is the onl/y one /I ca\n \remember havi【ng caused s】im【ilar damages\ \",【 Bianco explained. "The damag【e of this pheno【menon, in th】is\ 【case/, is to be attributed 】more to \h/o/w men\【 have decided to/ build than 【to nature,"【 she con【cluded.'Single\ muni】cipality'For\ Bo/relli, the situation is】 【"rea/lly deadly"."We have a simila】r situation to】 Japan, we are talking about 【the are】a】 with the/ highest number of volcanoe/s in 】Italy and at the same time\ the mos】/t\ densely populated and highly 【urbanised, with th\e gr】eatest\ anthro【pic pressure and the highest /rate】 】of illegal activity," he stressed."The absen】ce of an evacu//a【tion pl\an for Ischia】 is explained by an irresponsibl/e policy. N【【ature is cyc\lic/\al, we\ know that we will f【ace other】 earthquakes, perhaps \an e/ruption, it may be/ in a ce\ntury, in a millennium. W\e should have a pol】i/cy that loo/ks to t\omorrow but it would be necessary 】】to pu【t admini【strations and citize】ns in f/ront of t/he fact that some areas must be co\mpletely evacuate【【d," he continued.【A fisherman told【 Euronew】s on the s\hore of t/he p】o\rt tha】t a/ single【 admin/is/tration should be c/reated to come u【p wi/th a single evac】】uatio/n 【plan /】for t】he whole island a/nd t\h】at the mayors o\f/ th【e six municipalities should, th】erefore, wo\rk together."I think that i\f they do\n't do it, n【ature will/ do what we can【't do: Epomeo will explod】e, ma/ke six lavas【 of fire and fi\nally】 make a single municipality," he said【.Share 】t\his articleS【hare\T/weet\Sha】re/send】Sha\re/Tweet\SharesendMoreHideShareSend/ShareSha【reShare/\SendS【har】eShareYou migh】【t also li】ke 】 \ 【 】 /Ita】lian【 brid/】ge【 colla】ps\es injuring only/ 】one\ as lockdown condit\ions red//uce traff】【ic 】 】 【 Ita/lian d【o/ctor treats/ corona】virus patients【】 at h【o/me 【 】 【 / / 【 【 】/ Baskets of【/ s\oli\da/r【ity lowered/ from Na\ples balconie\s amid】 coro/na\viru/s chaos 】 】】 \Mo【r【】【e aboutVolcano eruptionItalyEnvironmental prote\ctionEm/er//gency / 【Brow【se to】day s\ tagspKQ0

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nGtxA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagsllaP

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